Category Archives: Running a Medical Practice

Keeping a Medical Office Clean

There is no arguing that first impressions matter. Whether you are meeting a new patient face-to-face or when there is a new client walking into your office for the first time, you want to make sure that you and your office look presentable. In addition to a well-designed office, you want to make sure that your medical office is impeccably clean as well. A simple cleaning won’t cut it as you want to keep your office sterile and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Keep your office clean to keep your office efficient.

Keeping your office clean should be top of mind, and it doesn’t have to be difficult. Here are some ways to stay on top of your office’s cleanliness:

Cleaning Services

Depending on your area, there are likely many cleaning services there that specialize in cleaning medical offices. You can look one up online using online review websites, or simply ask another health professional in the area if they can recommend a good one. A cleaning service has many benefits over cleaning your office yourself.

A great advantage to using a cleaning service is that it will save you and your staff time – thoroughly cleaning a medical office is not a quick task. You can also trust the cleaning service to clean every nook and cranny of your office that you might miss. However, make sure to be in communication with the cleaning service about any areas that need extra attention. They also should not be your office’s sole source of cleaning; you need to keep your office clean and sterile during the day as well (more on that next).

Guidelines for Staff

Your office will also need to be kept clean and sterile throughout the day, so make sure to clearly communicate cleanliness guidelines with your staff. Rooms will need to be cleaned after each patient, hands will need to be washed constantly, and more:

• When spills happen, clean them up as soon as they occur. Don’t let whatever spilled sit on the floor, and remember to use appropriate cleaning products.
• In exam rooms, use disposable paper and wipe down with disinfectant when needed.
• Regularly check the restrooms to make sure they are clean and tidy. Replace toilet paper and even use a disinfectant germicidal solution in toilet bowls during the day.
• Doorknobs and light switches get dirty too! Remember to clean with a disinfectant regularly.
• After each patient and before seeing a new one, make sure to wash your hands.
• Make sure that gloves are disposed of properly in infectious waste containers.
• Establish safe biohazard waste practices. Clean and disinfect any areas that come in contact with biohazards immediately and dispose of any biohazardous material in the proper receptacle.
• Keep employee areas clean too. Make sure that your staff keep their workspaces clean and uncluttered. Also make sure the breakroom is cleaned after every use, and remember to clean out the fridge at least once a week.
• Have the right cleaning tools and supplies on hand, and make sure your staff knows how to use them. It’s best to keep them in the same place so that everyone knows where they are.
• If a patient alerts you to a problem area, make sure to clean it immediately.
• If necessary, create a checklist for your staff. Remembering what to clean and when can be easy to forget.

No patient wants to go to a doctor’s office and question the cleanliness. Make sure to keep your office clean, sterile, uncluttered and smelling nice to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and to create a nicer environment for your client.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office.

How Much Staff is Needed in a Medical Office?

Determining how much medical office staffing you need can be a tough code to crack. There is no exact science to it, but there are industry guidelines that can point you in the right direction.

Every medical practice is different and has different needs, so finding what works specifically for your office is key. Here are some tips and guidelines to follow to help you determine how many people to hire:

Research Medical Office Staffing

Your first step should be to research and find reliable sources to point you in the right direction. the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), Practice Support Resources (PSR), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) all should have some good data that you can look over. When researching, you want to find the answers to these 2 questions:

1. Do we have enough people to do the work?

2. Are your staffing costs in line with other practices in the same field and size?

To answer those questions, you want to look for data points that address the percentage of revenue spent on support staff salaries and the how many support staff is needed per full-time-equivalent (FTE) physician.

Remember: While it’s important to research these data points, your office is unique and has different needs. Take your research as a starting point, and don’t be afraid to adjust if needed.

Support Staff to FTE Physicians

This ratio is crucial to determining how much staff is needed in your medical office as it tells you how many full-time staff will support one doctor. You can calculate the ratio with this method:

1. Figure out how many doctors work full time in your practice.

2. For the doctors working less than full time, divide their average number of hours by what you consider full times hours. For example, let’s say a doctor works 30 hours per week and you consider a full work week to be 40 hours. So 30/40 is .75, meaning that doctor’s FTE status is .75.

3. Now, calculate your total number of FTE physicians by adding the doctors from steps 1 and 2 together. So, if you have two full time doctors and one that works 30 hours a week, your total number of FTE doctors would be 2.75.

To determine your total number of FTE support staff, follow the same process and then you will arrive at your ratio of FTE support staff to FTE physicians. Using your research, this can help you determine how many people are needed in your office.

Other Factors

In most cases, other factors and special circumstances will affect medical office staffing– numbers alone will not calculate this. Your office will probably require both medical support staff as well as admin support staff. Don’t forget to take these job duties into consideration:

• Front desk and phone staff are needed at most practices. They will need to check patients in and out, schedule appointments and more. As your practice grows, you may need to have one person dedicated to answering the phones.

• You may need one person dedicated to referrals if you are a primary care office with more than three or four doctors.

• Billing can be outsourced or processed in-house, it’s up to you. Typically, one FTE employee is needed for every two physicians.

• Depending on the size of your practice, you may need a manager. If you have a lot of support staff, you may want to consider hiring one.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. We have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because we understand that every practice is unique, we can provide a custom space for your office.

Top Tips to Making Your Office Handicap Accessible

Making your office handicap accessible for your employees is vital to support a happy workplace environment. It’s important that all employees feel comfortable and are able to complete their jobs without any unnecessary hindrances. Wheelchair users and other people with disabilities affecting their mobility should be able to feel at ease in their work environment.

Making your office handicap accessible does not have to be difficult. A few changes can make a big difference. A key to making your office more accessible to avoid singling out certain employees. Rather, you want to make the office as a whole more accessible.

Do This First

You need to first determine how accessible your office is before you make any changes – which can be difficult if you yourself do not require accessible features. You can survey employees anonymously to give them a safe space to voice their concerns. Some may be hesitant to come forward if you haven’t asked them about this topic, so asking them through a survey is important.

Main Ways to Increase Accessibility

• Doors, especially heavy ones, can be difficult for someone using a wheelchair to open. Consider installing automatic doors that can be opened at the touch of a button. If that is out of the budget, you can install industrial gas springs to make the doors easier to open.

• There should be disabled parking spaces in your parking lot. The spaces should be as close to the entrance as possible, and require a blue badge to park in.

• If your office is in a multi-story building, make sure there is an elevator that employees can easily access. While stairs are great for able-bodied younger people, they can be hard on older employees and practically impossible to navigate for disabled employees.

• Make sure hallways are wide enough to accommodate different types of wheelchairs.

• Don’t forget about the bathroom. If your office does not have a big enough stall, you should consider installing one as soon as you can. If there are a few different bathrooms and only one is accessible, make sure that there is a sign telling people where to go.

• If the main entrance to your building or an entrance to an office space is not accessible, but there is an accessible entrance, make sure a sign is posted. The sign should tell people where to go to enter the building or office space.

• Spend some time with your employees to train them on appropriate interactions with people with disabilities. While your office needs to be physically accessible, your employees will also need to know how to treat people with disabilities.

• Offer employees flex time. This is an accommodation often requested by people with disabilities and is an easy way to help employees to stay healthy.

• People with low vision may have a hard time reading something in small print, so consider using larger print.

• Some employees may have a hard time operating their computer, so you can help them by installing programs to make it easier. Windows, Mac and other operating systems often have these features built in. To supplement these, there are a number of free programs available online.

• Once your office is completely accessible, get the word out. Include it on your website and recruiting materials so that people will know.

Making your office accessible can make your workplace more credible and more welcoming as an employer. You don’t want to miss out on great employee talent because your office is uninviting to people with limited mobility. With these changes, you should be on your way to becoming a friendlier office for all employees.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office.

How to Choose the Right Location for Your Medical Practice

Choosing the right spot when moving medical offices is critical to the success of your business. When you choose the right location, you can watch your business grow and flourish. Picking the right place is more an art form, not an exact science. There are a lot of factors to take into consideration when moving medical offices.

Patient-to-Professional Ratio

This little-known secret is majorly helpful when moving medical offices. You can do a simple analysis of when looking at potential areas. Look at the number of medical practices that do the same thing you do compared to the number of people. If there’s big number of medical practices, it’s best to move on. For example, if you’re a dentist it would be difficult to break into a community that has a lot of dentists already. Professionals usually overpopulate upscale areas, and are missing big opportunities a few miles away in middle/lower income areas.

Demographics

Another important consideration is the demographics of the area. The local chamber of commerce or newspaper should have them readily available. Start with compiling information from at least three areas that you’re considering.

First, think about the type of patient you are trying to or usually attract. Then look at the demographic information from each place for a match. Also look whether the population has been declining or increasing. Know that it’s easier to break into new areas where you won’t have to struggle to take patients away from already established practices. And obviously, you want to avoid fading communities.

Traffic

Often a forgotten about factor is the traffic patterns in an area. You might have to dig a little deeper in your research or go out there on your own to observe, but it will definitely pay off.

What you want to look for is the amount of cars going down the street of your potential new location. 40,000 cars a day is considered a prime retail location. Also take into consideration the traffic. Is it heavier during rush hour or about the same? Is it a generally lighter traffic area? Since we all hate traffic, plan accordingly.

You can also choose the side of the street for your location. Maybe on one side there’s a clearly marked way right into the parking lot, but on the other side you have to make a U-turn to get into the parking lot. Traffic could also be heavier on the West side than on the East side. Try to make getting to your location as convenient as possible for your patients.

Spreading the Word

If your practice is consumer-direct, you’ve got to be visible from the street. Does the landlord or city have any signage restrictions? Is your office visible from the street? Are there already many signs crowding the street that will make yours hard to see? After all, if consumers can’t see you from the street, you may as well not be there. Paying for a spot with great visibility can be more expensive, but it can pay off.

Specialists

If you’re a specialist, you have one more factor to consider: your proximity to large, referring practices. If you don’t have a relationship with those offices, find a way to introduce yourself and network. It can really pay off.

It even helps to be in the same building as them with your office on the ground floor. If you do that, 100% of the building foot traffic will go right by your door.

Common Sense

When choosing the right location for your medical practice you should do one thing above all: practice good common sense. For example, podiatrists probably either want to be on the first floor of the building or be in a building with a reliable, working elevator. Don’t be that podiatrist on the third floor of building with only stairs – how will your patients with foot problems get to you?

Choosing a new office space can be fun, exciting and even a little stressful. Follow these tips and tricks to lessen the stress and find the perfect space.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office. ‬

The Importance of a Good Receptionist

Some people consider the receptionist to be the most important staff member, or at least the most significant in determining how smoothly, effectively, and successfully an office runs. There’s even a holiday set aside for appreciating and honoring receptionists. But what makes a skilled and personable receptionist so essential? Read on to find out what traits a good receptionist should have, what to look for in a receptionist, and why they are so vital to the success of your office or medical practice.

Your Office’s First Impression

When considering what to look for in a receptionist, one must think about representation. Every member of your staff is a brand representative for your medical practice, whose behavior and appearance reflect on the entire practice. As your receptionist is generally the first face that patients see when they walk into your office and is the first point of contact when patients call, it is of the utmost importance that they make a great first impression. Your receptionist should have a professional appearance that makes him or her seem approachable and friendly. They should greet patients as soon as they walk through the door and interact with them in a polite, helpful, and friendly manner. A good receptionist should also have the knowledge to be able to answer patient’s questions. Most importantly, all of these things should be true at all times. Even during busy times or bad days, it is the receptionist’s job to project an air of helpfulness and positivity to all patients, both in person and over the phone.

Office Coordination

As the primary point of contact for the office, communication makes up a huge portion of a receptionist’s job. Your receptionist will need to facilitate communication between members of your medical practice’s staff, as well as between the office and its patients, payors, and vendors. The information that your receptionist provides will rarely be questioned, so accuracy is essential to prevent complicated and damaging mix ups. Your receptionist should be able to keep their cool under fire, communicating calmly and effectively, even when faced with a difficult patient or a tricky problem with a vendor. They should be able to manage a ringing phone, rapidly filling inbox, and growing line at her desk in a way that handles all inquiries as quickly as possible, while still making sure that every patient feels valued and every issue is resolved smoothly. Patients should never feel rushed by your receptionist, who should instead be a careful and conscientious listener. Your receptionist should also carefully maintain a calendar for the office and send out reminders before any important events, as well as be able to clearly distribute information to office staff and patients.

“Jack-of-All Trades” Capability

Because your receptionist works with everyone in your practice to facilitate communication and coordinate tasks, he or she needs to know everything that’s going on in your office and what everyone’s job is. This makes your receptionist a vital resource for team members who need information or support from another part of the team. This generalized knowledge and wide range of skills also makes your receptionist a valuable extra set of hands when you are short staffed or simply have an office to do list that has gotten a little too lengthy. Your receptionist can help plan upcoming events, manage the creation and distribution of promotional materials, handle mailing, restock storage areas, straighten up untidy spaces, and contact patients, payers, and vendors. A particularly experienced receptionist may even be able to assist more senior employees in their work. This jack-of-all trades mentality is what to look for in a receptionist.

Problem Solving

Your receptionist’s wide range of skills and abilities also makes them resourceful and flexible, ideal traits for problem solving. Your receptionist is often the first person in your office to encounter a tricky problem, whether it’s a problem with a vendor or an irate patient. A good receptionist is able to think quickly and creatively to resolve the issue in a way that keeps your practice running as smoothly as possible and makes both your patients and your staff confident and comfortable. In some situations, you may not even realize that a problem occurred in the first place!

Get More Help for Your Office

What to look for in a receptionist and understanding why they are so important can be very professionally enlightening. An excellent receptionist is key to running a successful and effective office or medical practice, but even the world’s best receptionist can’t help with every possible issue, like moving or expanding your medical office. That’s where Boulevard Medical Properties comes in. Boulevard LA is a Los Angeles based medical property specialist that can help your practice through the entire moving process, from finding a property to moving in. We can even help you develop an eco-friendly medical practice. Whether you are interested in expanding your practice into an additional location or want to move into a new space entirely, Boulevard LA has the experience and skilled staff to help, so contact our office today.

Your Checklist For Moving a Medical Office

You have found a great new space for your medical practice. You’ve even picked out the day or days that you will be moving offices. This can be a very exciting time for a medical practice, but it can also be overwhelming. Even for the most organized and prepared medical practice, it can be very easy to inadvertently let things slip through the cracks during the moving process, leading to excess stress or disaster later. If you’re moving your medical practice, try using this handy moving checklist to help keep your organized throughout the moving process.

Let Employees Know

You may have talked to some of your employees during the moving process, but don’t take for granted that the news has been passed around the office. Hold a meeting or send out a memo to make sure that all staff members are on the same page. Keep everyone updated about the process and send out reminders about upcoming deadlines to do with the moving process.

Let Payers Know

To ensure that revenue continues to flow in smoothly, let payers, such as Medicare and insurance companies, know about the move as soon as you have your new address. Different payers will have different requirements for what needs to be done to keep up with credentials, so be sure to communicate with payers to find out exactly what you need to do to make the process as smooth as possible.

Let Patients Know

Finally, let all your patients know that you’ll be moving offices. There are a number of form letters available that can be used, or make the message personal by composing your own. To make sure that every patient finds out, communicate to every single patient, even those in the same family or household, using all methods of communication that you can. Remember to include the new address, directions or a basic idea of the practice’s new location, and any new contact information that goes with the office, such as a new telephone number.

Establish an Inventory

It’s easy enough to misplace things in a residential move, but with medical offices the stakes are high. You’ll be moving expensive equipment, sensitive documents, and controlled substances. It’s important to have a complete, detailed record of all items you’ll be moving, including who’s responsible for transporting them between locations to avoid mix ups. You can also take this opportunity to get rid of any outdated technology or equipment or things you simply don’t use.

Have Utilities Transferred

Well ahead of the move, let utility companies know about your move, including the date and new address. Don’t forget to check utilities the day you move in to make sure everything is working before you start receiving patients in your practice’s new location.

Update Marketing Materials

Next, you’ll want to make sure that all of your information is correct to allow new patients to find and contact you. Change your practice’s website and update any business cards, fliers, and stationary. Inform the phone book publisher of your new address and contact information so that it can be updated in future copies, and let any directory websites know about the change to your address and any contact information.

Remind Patients with Upcoming Appointments

The last thing you need while adjusting to your new office space is for patients to not show up in the right place. Send out postcards or make phone calls (or, even better, do both) to remind patients with upcoming appointments of the location and provide them with directions to help make sure they show up to the right location on time for their appointment.

Order Signage

This is an easy step to forget, but it can make a big difference in how smoothly starting at your medical practice’s new location will be. Make sure you have clear signage for the exterior, clearly indicating the name of your practice, and making it obvious which building or unit you can be found in. You also want to have signage for the inside of your practice, clearly marking waiting rooms, exam rooms, and other spaces in your practice. You will also want to provide clear signage guiding patients to the exit, both for emergencies and for easily walking out of the practice. Mark where patients should check in, especially if there are multiple front desks for different purposes or patients, and check out.

Know Who to Ask for Help

Even with resources like this, moving offices isn’t easy, and neither is running a medical practice. Whether you’re looking to move medical practices, want to open a new location, need new medical equipment, or have any other issue or concern with your practice, contact Boulevard LA today. With our years of experience in assisting medical offices, both specialty and general, we can help your practice be all it can be.

10 Best Office Etiquette Tips for Your Medical Practice

Working in a medical office can be stressful, so it can be easy to let etiquette fall through the cracks. However, practicing proper etiquette is essential to ensuring that patients have an excellent experience in your office, helping you to retain and attract more patients. Here are some of the most effective office etiquette tips to help you and the staff of your medical office remember to stay at the top of your game.

1. Maintain a Professional Appearance

The way you look makes your first impression, so each member of your staff should keep a professional looking appearance at all times. Create and enforce a dress code among staff. This can be as casual or formal as you’d like. What’s most important is that all staff members are clean, tidy, and approachable-looking.

2. Use a Welcoming Greeting

Desk staff should greet patients as soon as they walk in the door. Other staff members should greet patients by name, introduce themselves by name and position, and inform the patient as to what steps and procedures they’ll be going through. Staff should do this even if they are wearing a name tag, which they should be doing at all times.

3. Remember Body Language

Office etiquette is all about impressions. Smile and make eye contact when first greeting a patient, and continue to make eye contact throughout the appointment to assure the patient that they have your full attention. Try not to slouch or fidget, and don’t move suddenly. Make it clear to patients with body words and body cues before you touch them.

4. Keep Patients in the Loop

Your patients want to know what’s going on during their appointment, especially if they’re one of the many people who are made anxious by medical appointments. If patients have to wait for a while, check in with them to ensure that they’re doing well and update them on when they’ll be seen. During the visit, let patients know what you’re doing before you do it, whether it’s taking vital signs, administering an injection, or taking a sample for a test.

5. Build a Rapport

Help put your patient at ease by opening your interaction with some small talk, such as about the weather, a recent holiday, or a major event in your community. This may seem like a waste of time, but helping patients relax into the interaction encourages them to open up to you about the medical problems that they are dealing with, which for some patients can be potentially awkward or embarrassing.

6. Be Present with Your Patients

Simply being in the room with your patients isn’t enough, medical professionals also need to be truly mentally present as well. With all the stresses of working in a medical office, it can also be easy to get distracted while spending time with patients. However, truly listening to the patient makes your patient feel more comfortable about the quality of their care and can also make the difference between a correct and incorrect diagnosis, so keep your focus on the patient, not on the screen of a device or your mental to do list.

7. Don’t Rush Patients

Take the time to allow patients to fully explain the reason for their visit, as well as ask any questions or voice any concerns they have about their treatment. This may extend your appointments a bit longer than you’d like, but it can also save time and improve the quality of the medical care you give by preventing follow ups or problems due to misunderstandings about how the patient should be taking a medication or caring for a health issue.

8. Keep Disagreements between Staff Under Wraps

No one gets along with all of their coworkers, so having disagreements between staff is totally normal and, assuming everyone handles the disagreement in a mature and respectful way, understandable. However, patients should never be able to detect strained relationships between staff members. This can create the appearance that your staff isn’t on the same page and make patients feel uncomfortable at your practice.

9. Make Arrangements for Follow Up

If your patient will need a follow up appointment or consultation at your practice, make sure someone in your office helps them to book that appointment before they leave the office. If patients have to schedule these appointments on their own, they often won’t. Patients that have more significant problems but don’t need a follow up appointment will still appreciate a follow up call. Put this on your calendar and have a staff member call to ensure that the patient is feeling better and getting the care they need.

10. Get Help When You Need It

While office etiquette is important, it’s not the only thing a medical practice needs to meet its potential and thrive while doing so. Whether you’re looking to move medical practices, want to open a new location, need new medical equipment, or have any other issue or concern with your practice, contact Boulevard LA today. With our years of experience in assisting medical offices, both specialty and general, we can help your practice be all it can be.

The Medical Benefits of Music for Your Practice

No one enjoys spending time in the waiting room, so it only makes sense for medical offices to do what they can to make the experience a bit more pleasurable. Magazines, televisions, and attractive decor are often used to make the waiting room experience easier and less boring for patients, but they are not the only things medical professionals can do to make patients’ time in the waiting room more bearable. The right music, such as jazz, classical, or light rock, can also make a big difference in the patient experience for your practice, and for more reasons than just making the waiting room more pleasant. Read on to discover a few of the amazing medical benefits of music for your practice.

Create a Pleasant Atmosphere

Of course any medical staff wants to make their practice more enjoyable for patients. You care about your patients’ well-being, so naturally you want them to have a positive experience in your medical office. However, you also know that your patients have options, so it is also essential to give them every possible reason to choose your medical practice rather than a competitor for their health care needs. Music is one way to create an enjoyable and pleasant environment in your office that gives you an edge over other practices. Remember, music doesn’t have to be limited to waiting rooms. Playing it in halls and exams rooms can help even the most uncomfortable aspects of a medical appointment a bit more enjoyable and memorable for your patients.

Help Patients Relax

Going to the doctor can be stressful. Taking time off work, finding parking in a busy area, and visiting a new doctor can all give even the most level-headed patients high stress levels before their appointments. This on top of existing illness or medical issues can make any person feel uncomfortable to say the least. Music in the waiting room can help patients wind down before their appointment. This is not only helpful for putting your patients at ease, but also has the added bonus of helping your medical staff get more accurate readings for vital signs affected by stress, like heart rate and blood pressure.

Other patients have anxiety or phobias about doctors or medical care in general. Having soothing music playing in treatment areas can make a huge difference in these patients’ anxiety levels and encourage them to use your practice in the future. Of course, this benefits the practice in that more business is always helpful, but it can also make a huge difference for the patients’ health and quality of life, as patients with these sorts of anxieties often elect to avoid medical care in general to avoid the fear and anxiety that accompanies it rather than seeking medical help for potentially serious health issues.

Reap the Medical Benefits of Music

Music is used in therapy for a reason. Music has been shown to aid health, and as we’ve discussed, lower stress. Studies indicate that music triggers the release of endorphins and immunoglobulins, which help patients heal more effectively. In general, the music that most effectively provides medical benefits includes elements such as:

• A slow and stable tempo
• Absence of percussive and accented rhythms
• Low volume level and soft dynamics
• Connected melodies
• Gentle timbre
• Simple harmonic or chord progressions

Of course, music over the audio system of a medical office is no replacement for music therapy conducted by a trained professional, however playing music throughout your office may help provide your patients and staff with some of the soothing medical benefits of music.

Professional Consultation for Your Medical Office

Music is just one way to create an attractive, relaxing, and efficient medical office space. For more ways to improve your office space browse our website or, if you’re looking for a more major medical office overhaul, set up a consultation with Boulevard Medical Properties. Boulevard Medical Properties can help you find a new medical office space based on your practice’s needs and goals, helping your practice to grow and expand. Regardless of if you’re just starting the moving process or almost finished, or what you need from a new medical office space, Boulevard LA can help you get the perfect medical office space for your practice. Contact Boulevard LA today to schedule your consultation.

Effective Medical Office Scheduling

Running a medical practice of any kind can be stressful and hectic, but using effective medical office scheduling strategies can help everything in your practice run a little smoother. Careful and effective scheduling ensures that everyone in the office, both staff and patients, are on the same page and know what to expect out of each and every day. Whether your office struggles with effective scheduling or is just looking to streamline the scheduling process, try implementing these tips to have your office running smoother than ever.

Start on Time

This may seem obvious, but few practices actually start the first appointment of the day at the time it is scheduled for. The first patient of the day is normally scheduled for 8 o’clock, but isn’t usually with the physician until 20 minutes later, even in a great practice. This isn’t usually because of a lazy or tardy staff, it’s because both patients and staff, including physicians, fail to account for the intake work before the appointment begins. Give patients an arrival time about 20 minutes before their appointment begins to allow for paperwork, insurance processing, and, if necessary, pre-payment. New patients may need even more time.

Choose Appointment Times to Maximize Effectiveness

Placing appointments for patients with similar conditions or procedure types on the same day or within the same time of day can help physicians make diagnoses and conduct quicker appointments by allowing them to stay in the same mindset across several appointments, rather than having to refresh their thought process for each appointment.

Schedulers may also want to consider prioritizing patients with more complex appointments. Try to book patients with complicated needs as soon as possible, and manage uncomplicated issues through group visits outside the office via phone or email. Though financial benefits from uncomplicated patients are lessened, you maximize the return from complex appointments, and increase the chances that uncomplicated patients will come to your office when they have more significant needs. On the other hand, if patients have to go elsewhere to get a timely appointment to address their serious issues, they may choose not to come back for minor needs.

Use Modified Wave Scheduling

Modified wave scheduling is a strategy of medical office scheduling that helps keep practices running on time even if they fall behind at some point during the day. This strategy involves booking multiple appointments at the beginning of the hour and leaving a buffer period at the end of the hour. At the beginning of the hour, long and short visits are scheduled simultaneously in pairs. The medical assistant rooms the patient with the short visit first and while the physician is with that patients, conducts the work up for the long visit patients, so that the long visit patient is ready to see the physician around the same time as the physician finishes with the short visit patient.

This more effectively uses the time that MAs and other support staff spend on visit preparation. Short appointments can also be booked during long appointments that don’t require the physician’s presence at all times. For example, a physician can conduct a short visit while a patient with long visit is having an x-ray performed. The emptier back end of the hour is used for catch up if patients show up late, appointments run long, or other unpredictable delays occur.

Respect Your Patients

Remember that your patients have taken time out of their own busy schedules, including many taking time off of work, to prioritize their health and come in to your office. Respect them, their schedules, and their choice to take care of themselves by striving to help them get in and out of your practice as quickly as possible without making patients feel rushed. All medical professionals in the office should strive to be punctual, keep all appointments, and meet all appointment times.

Get Help Keeping Your Medical Practice Running Smoothly

Running a medical office can be stressful and hectic, and this stress is only magnified when trying to move your medical practice or open a new location, but you don’t have to do it alone. Boulevard Medical Properties can help you find a new medical office space based on your practice’s needs and goals, helping your practice to grow and expand. Regardless of if you’re just starting the moving process or almost finished, or what you need from a new medical office space, Boulevard LA can help you get the perfect medical office space for your practice.

Contact Boulevard LA today to schedule your consultation.

5 Medical Office Tips to Make Your Practice More Efficient

Running an effective and successful practice can be a struggle for even the highest skilled professionals in the medical field. Technology is constantly advancing and so many things in healthcare change frequently so professionals need to be attentive in order to run a medical practice smoothly and successfully. But even if you feel like you have mastered it, there is always room for improvement. Take a look at these 5 medical office tips to make your practice more efficient and see if you can apply them to your office.

1. Pay Attention to the Front Desk

The front desk is the first thing patients will see when they walk in. Whoever is managing the desk will be the patients first impression of the practice and ultimately a large decision in whether or not they will continue to go back to that office. Patient satisfaction is key and can tell you whether you need to change the dynamics of your staff or continue what is working. The person managing the front desk should be able to handle insurance verification and co-payments in a well-organized manner. It is important that the person who is at the front desk can multitask in order to keep the front running smoothly and timely. By having qualified staff at the front, patients will be satisfied and so will the rest of the staff and physicians because they will not have to pick up any slack.

2. Consider Online Tech Tools

There are so many options available for you to do procedures online instead of inside your office. You can look into many like the ones below:

  • Online appointment bookings
  • Lab and test results postings and notifications
  • Prescription renewal
  • Billing, insurance and registration information
  • Medical history information
  • Secure messaging as another form of communication

These are good options to consider because they could be a more efficient use of time and resources. Many medical practices are using online appointment bookings because they allow for staff to do other things than booking appointments. This tool also helps maintain a schedule which is very important for patients and physicians. They may be expensive but they will most likely increase your revenue in the future.

3. Take Full Advantage of Staff Productivity

You can do this by making sure you have the right number of staff in the right area. You can ensure tasks are being done in the appropriate amount of time by implementing time checks. Although they may seem micromanaging at first, they are a good way to guarantee efficiency and organization for the entire staff. Time checks can be used as another source of communication and organization.

Make sure responsibilities match the skill level of your employees. For example, nurses can be doing something more resourceful with their time than stocking closets or rooms with supplies. They can do something within their license rather than clerical work that another employee who gets paid less can do. Always be sure to reference the level of license in order to keep your practice running as smooth and effectively as possible.

Cross-training staff is always a great thing to do so you have multiple people trained in different areas. This is helpful when an employee calls out because instead of scrambling, another employee can simply step in and help out. Cross-training is not that difficult to accomplish, you just have your employees shadow other employees for a day or as long as it takes. Among medical office tips, this remains the most important.

4. Add Staff as Needed

Don’t be afraid to add staff if it is necessary. We have all been kept waiting many times at many different places but your doctor’s office is not a place you want to experience that. You do not want to keep patients waiting or be buried in paperwork throughout the day or at the end of it. By hiring staff, the physician is able to see more patients because the practice runs smoother and they have less paperwork to do. This will ensure the happiness of the employees and patients.

5. Keep Your Exam Room Organized

There are a lot of things from printer stands to filing cabinets that are crammed into medical offices. To keep the office running efficiently, you need to make sure that all the things in the office are arranged and organized. Identify any areas where storage is needed and make sure all items are clearly labeled and ready for physicians and staff to access for top operational efficiency. Maintain a simple layout for the exam room. Instead of wasting time by searching for things, you will be able to efficiently do your job.

Schedule a Consultation

Considering the space and operations for your medical practice can be challenging, with multiple factors influencing your day-to-day operations and accessibility law requirements. Moving medical properties can be a positive experience for you and your patients, provided you take the necessary steps to ensure all processes are executed smoothly. Whether you are starting from scratch or in the early stages of planning your move, Boulevard LA has the expertise and knowledge to help guide you. Schedule an appointment here today.