Category Archives: Medical Office Rental

Below is the archive of all blog articles related to the category “Medical Office Rental”.

Medical Space Available in Los Angeles Today

Whether you’ve just graduated from medical or dental school and are looking to open a new practice, or you just need an additional office space, you need to look no further than Boulevard Medical Properties. Finding the perfect medical suites in Los Angeles and navigating lease negotiation, design and construction can be a time-consuming and exhausting process. Boulevard Medical Properties has years of experience and specialty with medical facilities, and we can use our unique expertise to guide you through the process of finding the perfect medical space. From leasing to design, we’ve got you covered!

We Specialize in Managing Medical and Dental Buildings

Once you are in your new medical or dental office space, Boulevard Medical Properties offers you a team of real estate professionals who understand the unique demands of operating a medical office building. Our team of in-house property managers provide a specialized service to all our clients which makes us Los Angeles’ best choice for a new medical or dental lease.

Medical Property Search

Using the Property Search Tool on our website, you can view all the medical suites in Los Angeles that are currently available through Boulevard Medical Properties.

Take a look at this list of some of the most promising medical suites in Los Angeles, currently available at Boulevard Medical Properties!

Brentwood

Wilshire West Medical Tower

11645 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90025
There are five spaces available on this property, including the penthouse suite. Square footage ranges from 846 to 2,657 sq. ft. per unit. This is a Medical Office Building with a total square footage of 76,760 sq. ft. All spaces are available For Lease at a rate of $4.25/RSF/Month.

Los Angeles

Brotman Physicians Plaza

9808 Venice Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90232
There is one space available on this property at 935 sq. ft. This is a Medical Office Building square footage is 48,925 sq. ft. The space is available For Lease at a rate of $3.50/RSF/Month.

Samaritan Medical Tower

1127 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90017
There are nineteen spaces available on this property, ranging from 475 to 5,412 sq. ft. per unit. This is a Medical Office Building with a total square footage of 144,998. All spaces are available for Lease at $3.05/RSF/Month.

Northridge

Northridge Medical Tower

18250 Roscoe Boulevard, Northridge, CA 91325
There are two spaces available on this property, at 804 and 1,961 sq. ft. per unit. This is a Medical Office Building with a total square footage of 33, 731. All spaces are available for Lease at $2.80/RSF/Month.

Go Green!

At Boulevard Medical Properties, we encourage our tenants to “Think Green.” We set the bar as owners and property managers by doing our best to use eco-friendly materials in our buildings, and constructing new suites using the latest in energy efficient fixtures. Our move towards eco-friendly products and construction practices is designed to take your patient experience to the next level by making sure your space is as environmentally friendly as possible.
Boulevard Medical Properties is one of the premier experts in leasing, designing and constructing medical suites in Los Angeles. We understand that every medical and dental practice is unique. We have helped countless doctors, dentists and other medical professionals find the perfect space for them. Boulevard Medical Properties would be thrilled to have your practice as part of our medical community. Search Properties on our Website or contact us to get started!

Types of Medical Practices

Whether you are fresh out of your residency, looking to branch out on your own, or are looking to expand your current practice, there are a variety of medical practices to choose from. With each type of medical practice comes different responsibilities, elements, and benefits to consider. Although there are a multitude of factors to consider, Boulevard Medical Properties has made part of the process easier by being dedicated to connecting you with the perfect medical office space for lease.

Solo Practice

As its name suggests, a solo practice is a practice without partners or employment affiliations with other practice organizations. This type of medical practice allows the physician to have optimal control (i.e. deciding which patients they see, who they hire, hours they work, etc.). However, with a solo practice also comes some risk that other practices may not have. According to the American College of Physicians, “The locale in which you wish to practice will sometimes determine the success of a solo practice. Suburban or rural areas are often better suited for solo practice because of significant medical need and less competition from other medical resources.” That is why it is important to speak with our experts at Boulevard Medical Properties, because we understand what your practice means to you and can help you find which medical office space for lease is best for you.

Group Practice

A group practice is different than a solo practice because there is a presence of two or more physicians providing patients with one specific type of care. With a group practice comes the benefits of added financial security, not having to start from scratch, and added support from others on the team. This is a great option for physicians who are looking to play a significant role in the practice but want more safeguards and support in place. With a group practice comes the need more or room and a comfortable space for all your team members, staff, and patients.

Employed Physician Practices

This type of medical practice is when a physician is being employed within one of several practice models. Joining this type of medical practice can be advantageous to the physician by removing the administrative roles of the job and allowing them to solely focus on their area of expertise. You may relinquish even more of your control over the practice with this option, but you will not need to ever worry about the logistical problems. Scheduling, patient contact, accounting, and many other menial tasks are taken care of through employed physician practices.

Medical Office Space for Lease

Regardless of the type of practice that you chose, it is important that you choose the right place to set up shop so that you establish a successful practice. With investment in your vision, knowledge of the field, and “go green!” initiative, it is not hard to see why Boulevard Medical Properties are the experts when it comes to finding physicians the perfect medical office space for lease. To connect with their team and see what medical offices are available around you, contact them today.

Getting Started in Commercial Real Estate

The first step when planning to purchase commercial real estate in Los Angeles is to write down the type of property you are looking for. Will it be used as your place of business, as an investment property, or for something else? If investing, are you willing to put in the work to be a landlord? If you are looking for a business property, do you need to buy, or could you lease instead? Do you already have a location in mind? What is your status regarding cash, financing, and your ability to make a down payment?

To get your property search underway get in touch with Boulevard Medical Properties today.

Accept the Learning Curve

It will be easier for you to work with people in commercial real estate in Los Angeles if you learn some of the industry lingo.

  • Loan-To-Value (LTV): A ratio of how much money you’re asking from a lender vs. the total value of what you want to purchase.
  • Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSC): Operating income over total debt service. Basically, how much of the debt you’ll be able to cover each year with income.
  • Capitalization Rate (Cap Rate): Income of the property divided by the total value of the property.
  • Cash on Cash: Annual income over how much you actually invested. The amount invested could be just the amount your down payment was.
  • Vacancy Rate: Percentage of properties that are vacant in a time period in a given area.
  • Ad Valorem: A tax based on the assessed value of a piece of property.

Consider a Variety of Properties before Making a Choice

When visiting the different properties, make note of what you like and dislike about each of them. Location can strongly influence a property’s value – as well as how fast it sells – and its importance cannot be emphasized enough.

What you’re looking for is a good “fit” on as many fronts as possible. You want a property in the right place, for the right price, that serves that right purpose.

Hire the Experts

Buying commercial real estate in Los Angeles can be complex. Depending on the type of property you purchase, you may need to hire an

  • Accountant
  • Commercial real estate lawyer
  • Commercial realtor
  • Mortgage broker
  • Tax expert
  • Notary
  • Appraiser
  • Engineer
  • Environmental specialist

There’s plenty you can do on your own, but some jobs just require expert knowledge to be done properly.

Figure out Financing

Most people need at least some financing help to purchase a property. You can use

  • Banks
  • credit unions
  • home mortgage companies
  • Also, think about what kind of credit you have and ask what interest rate the companies can give you
    If these traditional financing methods don’t work for you, find out if the seller can help. Read up on things like
  • seller carry-back
  • subject-to
  • second mortgages
  • lease options

Make an Offer!

When you are ready to make an offer, consult with your lawyer and tell him or her about your plans. Your lawyer will have you sign a Letter of Intent (LOI) about the property and all the contracts involved. The LOI is NOT binding.

Never sign anything without your lawyer reviewing it first. Have your lawyer explain what all written agreements mean to you in plain English (or hire an interpreter to explain in the language with which you are most comfortable.)

Due Diligence and Escrow

This is where you get down to the details.

  • You will order an ALTA (American Land Title Association) survey, which can be used as part of the due diligence.
  • You and the seller will hire an escrow officer to be the neutral third party in the sale.
  • The final closing documents must be produced.
  • You have the right to a final inspection of the property. If something negative comes up and you want to cancel the purchase, you have a right to tell the escrow officer to deny the transfer of funds.

If you are looking for medical and dental office space at prime locations in Los Angeles, the search is over! Boulevard Medical Properties has the space for you. From practices like USC Fertility and Perinatal, to State of the Art Imaging Centers and Community Clinics, Boulevard buildings are home to a wide variety of medical professionals – and we want to welcome you to our community! Contact Us Today to set up an Appointment!

Benefits of Leasing Commercial Property

If you are a new or small business, the decision of whether to buy or lease commercial property is a significant choice to make. Weighing the negatives versus the benefits of leasing commercial property can be easy with help from Boulevard Medical Properties. Find out what the top advantages are of choosing a commercial lease in Los Angeles and learn about how leasing will help your business grow and how it will also save you money.

Upfront Costs

Owning a building comes with other costs that aren’t included in the real estate estimates. Keeping up on building maintenance through cleaning, electricity and providing internet is a large expense that potential buyers often do not consider. When you are a leasing tenant, however, this maintenance cost is not your responsibility. Some buildings may ask for a yearly or monthly fee for cleaning, but it is a significantly smaller total than taking care of it completely on your own dime.

Moving into a leased building is also a much simpler task. If you are using a loan to cover the purchase of a corporate building, most lenders take a large down payment, and charge interest on all money loaned. With a leasing agreement, you would only pay a refundable deposit along with the first rent payment and no accrued interest. Renting allows for small and new businesses to avoid several costs that could eventually become too expensive to sustain. Also, leasing costs are completely deductible, unlike mortgage costs which are only partially deductible. More and more start-up companies are opting for leasing options to decrease their overall spending, especially in the first few years of business. If you’re looking for a commercial lease in Los Angeles for your new or small business, contact the professional team at Boulevard Medical Properties to start finding your next great office space.

Flexibility

One of the most common reasons new or small business opt to rent office space instead of buying buildings, is that they gain a flexibility to move buildings and move neighborhoods depending on their rate of growth. If your business fluctuates quickly, you can end your lease and move to a larger building to accommodate for the new hires or new equipment. If the opposite were to occur, the option is also great for business looking to downsize. Companies that are looking to move from one area in the city to another for growth potential or in response to client onboarding have the freedom to do so without worrying about selling a building while trying to find another or having to find a tenant while still technically occupying the space.

Maintaining office buildings both inside and out is a difficult and expensive job, but leasing allows tenants to simply move if a newer or better office opportunity comes their way. Legally, tenants can also put in personal requests with landlords or building owners to make repairs or upgrades to the occupied building. In some cases, this is a better option for both the renter and the owner, as the renter will get a more upgraded office building without having to leave the space, and the owner will not lose out on rent money or the responsibility of having to find a new tenant. This is another flexible option afforded to you as the tenant as the decision-making process about whether to leave or extend a lease sits primarily in your hands.

If you are a new or small business owner interested in getting a commercial lease in Los Angeles, contact our skilled team at Boulevard Medical Properties. We can help you find the right building at the right price and you can get your business moved into the perfect new property.

How to Start a Medical Practice

After years of studying and training to become a practicing physician, the first thing on new doctors’ minds is putting those years of hard work into action. They enter the workforce and begin the work they were called to do. Somewhere along their career, however, they might begin to wonder if there is a realistic way to start their own medical practice and be their own boss. We at Boulevard Medical Properties are here to tell you that starting your own medical practice is an achievable goal if you follow these steps.

Funding

Starting a medical practice is like running a start-up business. You will need to apply for business loans to cover the vast number of building expenses. Things such as purchasing an office building, construction work and remodeling will run up a large tab. Comparatively, you can find a medical office space for lease in Los Angeles to cut down your construction costs and ensure that your office is maintained by a third party. Both scenarios will require some sort of funding and are your first step towards become a small business owner.

Receiving a loan is a terrific way for you and your business to establish credit and have a cushion for the first few years while your business is growing. Doctors who can afford all the expenses themselves should still consider the advantages of a secured small business loan. If you are more partial to renting office space instead of purchasing a whole building, check out the available medical office spaces for lease in Los Angeles to explore this option further.

Insurance Credentials

To accept your new patients’ insurance, you will need to go through the process of applying for your credentials. This process is somewhat lengthy, taking up to several months to complete. Do research to discover exactly what types of insurance you want to accept and check with your state requirements to understand the qualifications your practice may need.

Once you’ve decided which programs you’d like to partner with, you will either accept their general reimbursement strategies, or negotiate new ones based on what procedures you do and what area of medicine you specialize in. While Medicare and Medicaid offer the same reimbursement benefits to the doctors they contract with, other smaller insurances will be able to negotiate smaller, more personalized contracts if you choose to associate with them. This will also widen the number of patients you are able to care for under insurance benefits.

Legal & Licensing

It’s a good idea to enlist an attorney who can help you draft your articles of incorporation, receive your employer identification number and learn about your state requirements for completing a tax registration. You’ll also need to decide what kind of corporation structure you want to follow based on the benefits each type offers. Your attorney will be able to help you research the business structure options and make a calculated decision unique to your practice.

You’ll also want to research the licensing procedures you’ll have to adhere to depending on your state and chosen specialty. Your licensing will depend on four things: state requirements, a national provider identification number, DEA registration and any additional regulations that will be determined by your specialty. Researching the requirements before you begin will help speed up the process in the future.

Challenges

Every start-up business is full of obstacles and starting a medical practice is no different. Some of these challenges include the state you practice in and the special registrations you might have to go through to create a medical business. Next, consider the healthcare facilities that are available in your state, and their proximity to your practice as this competition can either help or hinder your goals. If you want to be certain that there are limited competitors for your specialty, research available medical office spaces for lease and determine if leasing your office is the right choice based on the kind of medical facilities they lease to already.

Finally, there may be a lapse between seeing your patients, administering care and getting paid by their insurances. This gap could become a financial burden on your practice, but you can avoid it by taking down your patient’s insurance before bringing them in for their appointment.

Medical Office Space for Lease

Starting your own practice can be a daunting goal, but if you are able to efficiently navigate the terrain and formulate your business structure effectively, it can also prove to be an incredible success. To find the ideal medical office space for lease in Los Angeles, get in touch with Boulevard Medical Properties today.

Launching Your Medical Practice

There’s a lot to take into consideration when launching your first medical practice. Before you begin, you might want to think about the steps involved in launching your practice successfully.

Budgeting, financing, finding the right medical office space for lease, and legal document signing are just some of the many steps you’ll need to take on the road to having your own practice. Whether you already have a business plan in mind or not, it doesn’t hurt to look at the steps below to use as a guide.

Our experts at Boulevard Medical Properties want to make sure you are fully equipped with the knowledge and tools that you’ll need for success when opening your first medical practice. Though there are many steps involved, by following each one carefully, you can prevent yourself from becoming overwhelmed.

Step 1: Think About Financing

Budgeting is never a fun topic, but it’s a necessary one if you want to open a successful practice. First, you’ll need to develop your pro forma – which is similar to your business plan. A good pro forma gives you better opportunities for investments and financing. Your pro forma allows you to plan how you are going to obtain your initial revenue, and what kind of revenue you expect to project over the first year or so of your practice.

Don’t hesitate to shop around for the best loans and financing structures. Don’t rely on just a single lender or the first bank you see – ask around and get estimates so you know you can get the best deal around. There are waiting periods you can take advantage of too, so that you are able to prepare for the next steps.

Step 2: Think About Equipment and Staff Members

Now that you’ve obtained the proper funding and financing to start up your medical practice, you need to invest in the proper equipment and staff members so that your medical office will function smoothly. You want a talented team by your side, helping you to accomplish the day-to-day tasks as well as handle the immediate needs of patients and other clients.

Once you’ve got a healthy team of staff members underway, you also need to start considering what equipment to buy. Many practices find benefit from investing in an electronic health record system, which is a great way for keeping records and documents safe on digital files. Systems such as medical billing services and transcription software are also necessary in this day and age.

Plus, you’ll have to consider all your ancillary services as well. For example, do your patients enjoy being able to get bloodwork and other specialty tests done on-site? If you’re a specialty practice, you might want to make sure that you have all your specialty equipment and services available in your office. This will make customers happy as they can rely on you to complete every step of their medical needs.

Step 3: Consider the Final Tips Before You Open

You’re almost ready to open your medical practice! Lastly, you’ll want to make sure that your practice is insured – this is an absolute necessity – and that your physicians and staff members have their proper credentials and payment methods set up.

Next, you’ll want to clearly line out the policies, procedures, and practices that are integral to the well-being and functionality of your office. Make sure each staff member and representative are aware of the dos and don’ts of your practice, including how to deal with patients, what treatments can be given, and what billing steps need to be taken. Once you’ve gotten all this underway, it’s time to open your doors!

Medical Office Space for Lease

You’re finally ready to open your first medical practice. With your financing options locked in, your staff members hired, your equipment ready to go, and your insurance and company policies laid out, you have everything you need to get started.

Remember to stay true to your practices and to always seek advice if you have any further questions. If you’re in need of a medical office space for lease, or if you need more tips about how to successfully start on your own, you can contact our Boulevard Medical Properties professionals online or you can give us a call at (818) 882-5700 at any time.

Guide to Choosing the Right Location for Your Medical Office

Finding the right location for your medical practice is just as important as finding the right location when you are purchasing a home. No matter what type of real estate you are looking at, the adage rings true, it’s all about location, location, location. Read on to learn more about what to consider when looking for a new location for your medical office and what pitfalls you would be wise to avoid.

For assistance in locating the right medical office lease in Los Angeles, utilize Boulevard’s property search feature.

Consider your Patients

The first thing to consider when looking at office locations is the type of patients you already have and those you wish to attract. What are your patient demographics? What is your specialty? Is your practice full of women, men, athletes, baby boomers, kids? Taking this into consideration really can impact your location.

For example, is your current practice full of suburban baby boomers? Then perhaps a strip mall in the outskirts of town is what you need to make it convenient for your patients to get to you and to market effectively to grow your practice.

But what if your practice is full of young or working professionals? Then an office in the suburbs would be difficult for them to get to you. You might want to consider something downtown so those working in the city center can get to you quickly and easily.

What if your patient base if full of athletes? Then perhaps you should consider setting up an office location near a university or the practice facility for a professional sports team, or even a popular gym. This would allow you to market to your base and make it easy for them to see you. Considering your patient base and your specialty can be critical in choosing the right location.

Consider Your Competition

Another key component to think about when choosing a location is your competition. You want to put yourself in a position to succeed so you need to look at the competition in your area. If there are five other professionals within a ten-mile radius practicing the same thing you are, then you might want to look somewhere else for office space. Do your homework and check the population to professional ratio for your area.

If you are just starting out and you find that your competition is overpopulating the upscale neighborhoods in the area you want, consider setting up your practice in the suburbs just a few miles away. There might be some opportunity to develop a large patient base. Your competition could be overlooking a potentially lucrative area.

You should also investigate whether the population of the area you want is growing or declining. It is typically easier to set up shop in a newer community rather than try to break in to an established area with a lot of competition. A lot of this information is available on the U.S. Census website. There is a great deal of information available if you are willing to take the time to comb through the site. You should also contact the local Chamber of Commerce as they have some great information available as well.

Additional Considerations

If your practice is going to rely heavily on insurance, you should take a close look at the employers in the area. Do they offer the insurance you accept? You should also consider locating your office next to a hospital as this can create a good image as you will be in an area associated with health care.

And, of course, there are many things to consider in terms of the actual building you are looking for. If future expansion is your goal, does the space offer enough square footage? Does the location offer convenient, well-lit parking? What does the building look like? Is it well maintained, or does it look run down?

Medical Office Lease in Los Angeles

There is a lot to consider as you research a potential medical office lease in Los Angeles. A smart piece of due diligence would be to contact Boulevard Medical Properties to schedule a consultation. The Boulevard team has the knowledge and expertise to point you in the right direction and get you into a space that works for your organization.

Is the Open-Concept Officially Dead?

The new millennium brought a new style of office to the U.S. that took off with many technology companies and startups. It’s what’s known as the “open concept” or “open work space”. However, after more than 15 years have passed, the effects of this workspace structure are now being evaluated.

If you are interested in browsing office space in Los Angeles, use Boulevard Medical Properties to secure your custom-designed work space to help your practice thrive.

What Exactly is an “Open-Concept” Office?

The open concept work space started in Germany decades ago, but it started to gain popularity in the United States around the year 2000. Companies like Google, Facebook, and eBay have all popularized this office layout. The idea behind it is to have an office space without cubicles, dividers or offices. Desk space would be open, where employees would be able to see other workers. The initial intention for this type of work environment was to encourage collaboration and a “team” environment among employees. By keeping the work space “open”, the hope was that this environment would keep communication and relationships between fellow coworkers open and friendly.

Downsides to the Open-Concept

One of the major goals that seemed to come out of the open concept office space was to create a place of employment that was fun and where employees wanted to come to work and were happy. While that may certainly be the case, there is one major flaw with the open concept. Thanks to a study of over 40,000 employees from over 300 companies with an open concept office space, it is very clear about one thing: the open office concept is killing productivity.

Productivity is an essential, key component to any successful business. You hire a certain amount of workforce with the expectation that you are getting 40 (or more) hours a week from your full-time employees. When this is gravely affected by countless interruptions, far too much socializing and “playtime”, the result can be disastrous. Even with an attempt to drown out potential noise distractions with headphones, it is impossible to avoid visual distractions that happen with the open concept office.

Another major downside to the open concept is chain of command and privacy. With the open floor design of the open concept, it is almost impossible to have privacy. Even if you went to another private office for a conversation, it can be difficult to do with all eyes looking up at you or noticing. Further, if you work in a shared office space with someone with whom you report to, this can often times become far too close or social of a relationship, making the supervisor to subordinate relationship challenging.

Evaluate Your Office Space

If you currently have an open concept office space, you may want to evaluate how the layout of your office is impacting worker productivity, as well as office morale. Take a look at how the layout may impact interruptions amongst employees and whether gossip or other conflicts within the office may potentially be resolved by being willing to give workers their own work space and begin to create a whole new working environment for you and your company.

If you are looking to open up your own office (or relocate to a new office space) and have been considering the open concept, you may wish to reconsider this type of office layout and its potential impact on your business.

Office Space in Los Angeles

If you are in the medical field and are looking to establish office space in Los Angeles, then look no further than Boulevard Medical Properties. Whether you want an open concept office, cubicles or private office space, we have assisted several practitioners in all areas of setting up their own dream office space. From expansion, lease negotiation, construction, and design, contact us today at (818) 882-5700 or you can also contact us online.

7 Questions to Ask Yourself When Moving to a New Office Space

The cost of office space is one of the single largest expenditures for any medical practice, so it’s important to know exactly what you’re getting from your space before signing a lease. You want to be cost effective, but it’s also essential to find a space that works for your medical practice’s needs. The last thing you want to do is move into a new space and find out that it’s not working out, forcing you to spend even more to break the lease and move again. Plus, constant moves can lose you patients. Here are some ideas for a moving offices checklist and questions to ask before you move into a new office space.

1. Is Renting or Buying Better for My Practice?

Buying a property for your medical practice’s office space may actually be a better option for your practice than renting one. For example, buying opens up doors for making your property an investment, provides more potential for expansion without relocation, and makes annual costs more predictable. On the other hand, renting requires less upfront cost and less commitment to the locations, and you don’t have to handle refinancing. Working with a real estate professional can help you determine which option is right for your practice’s needs.

2. How Much Space Do We Need?

Size is probably the primary consideration when it comes to determining your practices needs. Too little space and your practice will be crowded and take a hit to productivity, but too much space is a waste of money. A general rule when determining your medical practice’s space needs is 1200 to 1500 square feet for the first physician (or single physician practices), plus 1000 1200 square feet for each additional physician. Some practices, like psychiatrists, will need less while others, such as outpatient surgery centers or practices with large equipment, will need much more. An average family physician will generally need about three exam rooms and one procedure room, but this can vary depending on specialties and the number of physicians in the practice. At minimum, a medical practice should have a reception area, a front office, a physician’s office, two treatment rooms, and a restroom.

3. What Are Our Accessibility Needs?

All medical offices need to be handicap accessible, but, like with space needs, certain practices will have greater accessibility needs than others because of the patients they receive. For example, a physical therapist or an orthopedist will likely see far more patients with mobility issues than a dermatologist or a periodontist. Your practice needs enough parking spaces, elevators, and ramp access to easily accommodate handicapped patients without causing waits, crowded, or awkward situations. Automatic doors may also be a good addition. Remember that bathrooms and exam rooms need to be easily accessible, with plenty of room to turn a wheelchair around inside, and with all of the necessary supports to help a patient with limited mobility move around, and don’t forget to leave room for wheelchair parking in waiting areas.

4. How Much Will It Really Cost?

Obviously rental or mortgage payments have to be made, but not all payment systems are alike, and there’s plenty more that must be factored in before you can really understand the cost of your space. Some landlords require tenants to have insurance for the space, and while some will foot the bill themselves, others pass that responsibility onto you. Know who’s responsible for utilities. Sometimes landlords will absorb these costs, other times it’s all on the tenants, and still other times there’s a division of responsibility. Be sure you know how much you can expect to pay each month and remember, a space with cheaper rent can still be costlier than a space with a higher rent if utilities are lower. Higher rent may also come with benefits like property maintenance or pest control that would otherwise come out of your pocket, while lower rent may be because of problems and lower profitability associated with the property. Finally, don’t be afraid to shop around. By moving just a short distance farther from a major hospital, you may be able to get a nearly identical space for much less.

5. What’s the Timeline?

First, make sure your building will let you move in when you want, so you aren’t on the hook for the apartment before you need it, but can also be certain that the space will be available for you when you need it. You should also know how long the lease length is and how much flexibility you have with negotiating lease length to make sure you’ll have the property for the time frame that’s right for you. You should also make sure you know what your options are once the lease is up. Will renewing the lease be an option and how will the price be affected?

6. Who Is Responsible for What?

The divisions of responsibility in a rental aren’t necessarily consistent between properties. Make sure you know who is responsible for which utilities and how much of each. Even if some utilities are included in the cost of rent, all may not be, and some landlords only cover up to a certain amount. You also need to know who’s responsible for maintenance. You don’t want to commit to a property only to be surprised when you have to arrange and foot the bill for repairs or upkeep. You also need to know if you or the landlord pays for improvements to the space.
When you are through with your moving offices checklist, it’s time to settle in. If your practice needs a home, or you are just looking to expand, contact Boulevard LA today. We offer a number of locations that are suitable for medical practices of all kinds. We have years of experience finding suitable spaces for specialty offices and general practices, so schedule a meeting today to see what we can do to get you into the perfect medical office space for you and your practice.

Choosing the Right Medical Office Space

Whether you’re moving an existing medical practice, opening a new location of an existing practice, or opening a new practice for the first time, finding the right space for your medical office can be overwhelming. There are so many things about the office space that have to be just right, and it can feel impossible to know how to choose the best office for your practice. Thankfully, Boulevard Medical Properties is here to help. Over time, we’ve discovered the most important factors to consider when choosing a new medical office space, and we’ve assembled them here to help you.

Affordability

Obviously, the cost to lease is important, but affordability goes beyond just the sticker price. A space with a higher price may actually be cheaper per rent, or may come with more support from the property owner in the form of services like property maintenance or pest control. A medical office space available at a lower cost may be cheaper because the location is not as profitable. In short, remember that neither cheaper or costlier guarantees a better medical office space, so when choosing a new office space, conduct a thorough cost-benefit analysis.

Aesthetics

The importance of an attractive medical office is often overlooked, but the look of your office communicates a message to both patients and potential employees on both the inside and out. A well-kept, attractive, and secure feeling medical office can make patients feel confident about the credibility of the practice and the quality of the care that they will receive there. Inversely, a dirty or unattractive office can drive patients away. Your office also conveys a sense of the type of workplace your office is to potential staff members. Medical professionals have options, so don’t drive away the best with an unpleasing office.

Accessibility

Accessibility can mean two things. First, is it easy for patients of all kinds to find your office? Second, is it easy for patients with disabilities or limited mobility to find, enter, and move around your office? Offices should generally be located near major roads or thoroughfares, and ideally no more than two turns from a highway, if there is one nearby. Remember, many of your patients won’t feel well, so you don’t want them to have to do extra work. Being close to major roads also gives your office exposure just by people driving by. Once your patients have located your office, do they have convenient and ample parking, including handicap parking? Is there a ramp for your less mobile patients? If needed, are there enough elevators and stairways so patients can easily access their needed floor without a long wait?

Other Providers

Obviously you don’t want your medical office located around a bunch of competing practices, but it’s not that simple. In addition to checking the professional to population ratio areas around potential medical office spaces, you will also want to consider where specifically competitors are located and how aggressive and effective their marketing campaigns are. This can reveal some insights you might have missed otherwise. For example, areas with high income levels can often be over-saturated with healthcare providers while nearby middle or even lower income areas are largely un-serviced, providing a plentiful stream of patients for the practice that begins to service these areas.

Furthermore, potential competition is not the only reason you should know about surrounding medical care providers. Locations near complementary healthcare providers can be incredibly profitable for medical practices. Locating your practice near providers that offer complementary healthcare services and developing relationships with these providers can allow for inter-referring patients, providing advantages to all practices involved. Traditionally, this has meant locating practices near hospitals, but as more and more procedures are being performed as outpatient procedures, it has become possible for healthcare practices to develop these kinds of relationships farther away from hospitals, allowing for lower lease rates.

Get Help from the Professionals

No matter what kind of medical office space you’re looking for, you don’t have to search on your own. Boulevard Medical Properties can help you find a new medical office space based on your practice’s needs and goals, helping your practice to grow and expand. Regardless of where you are in the process, what you need from a new medical office space, and why you’re looking, Boulevard LA can help you get the perfect medical office space for your practice. Contact Boulevard LA today to schedule your consultation.