Open Office Floor Plans vs. Cubicles

Working in an office comes with two challenges: productivity and collaboration. In an ideal world, you could shoot two birds with one stone—that is, work at an insanely efficient rate while fostering teamwork.

But this doesn’t happen in the real world. Managers decide which comes as a priority at the expense of the other. Oftentimes, the blame is assigned to the office layout.

When you are ready to find a medical office lease in Los Angeles, contact Boulevard Medical Properties today to begin your property search.

The Rise of the Open Office

Traditional offices were littered with cubicles, the partitioned workspaces that many considered as stifling. The 1950’s saw a change in the office landscape as German brothers Eberhard and Wolfgang Schnelle designed a workplace void of partitions.

This new office plan encouraged communication and teamwork among employees by removing hindrances to interactions and movements. It won the hearts of many companies that wanted to increase workspace area while reducing furniture cost.

Cubicles cost twice as much than the long desks often found in open office layouts. An 8-foot-by-8-foot cubicle costs about $3,500, whereas a bench station costs about $1,250. Looking at those numbers, an executive can make a decision based on cost. Open office space wins hands down.

Dying productivity

But the real cost here lies not on the price tag of office furniture. According to a survey by the Oxford Economics, open office plans can hinder productivity.

Although they are meant to boost collaboration, open offices do not necessarily promote productivity. While employees can openly communicate with each other, visual and noise distractions prevent employees from working efficiently. Without any walls to block out distractions, thinking deeply becomes nearly impossible.

“Quick chatter”, ringing phones, and other commotions waste employees’ time. The lack of control in the environment means that employees have to come up with ways to signal others that they are busy at work.

Headphones on usually means that an employee does not want to be interrupted, which sadly goes against the culture of collaboration that open spaces aim to promote.

The Action Office

Both cubicles and open office floor plans have their own merits.
Cubicles deter interruptions that would hinder productivity. Since cubicles have walls that cut down visual distraction, focusing on work is easier. They also have built-in power plugs and sockets where employees can easily plug in their equipment without disturbing their colleagues.

On the other hand, it is much easier to connect with others with an open office layout. With fewer physical barriers, communication flows better.

But neither the cubicle nor the open office layout is perfect. Both have their shortcomings when it comes to productivity and collaboration.

In 1964, Herman Miller, an American furniture company, designed what would have been the ideal office layout.

Called the action office, this workspace features multiple desk heights, larger surfaces, and other moveable components that allow employees to sit or stand while working.

The goal of the action office is to give workers the autonomy to modify their working spaces—to sit or stand as they please—and boost their productivity in the process.

Unfortunately, other office furniture companies saw this as an opportunity to cherry pick parts that they would later sell as individual components. The modular components are space-savers perfect for companies that want to maximize their real estate, but they lack the human touch attributed to the action office originally designed by Herman Miller.

The Modern Office

These days, we see a combination of the traditional cubicle and the open office layout. Long worktables are still part of the office design, but pods and other enclosed spaces provide some privacy.

Medical Office Lease in Los Angeles

Searching for a medical office lease in Los Angeles? Boulevard Medical Properties can help you build the ideal office for your business. Request a free quote today.

When are the Least and Most Productive Hours of the Day?

Have you ever tried to focus on a task only to find your attention waning? We’ve all been there, and it’s not entirely your fault if you can’t seem to get anything done. When it comes to productivity, motivation is only a part of the equation. You have to listen to your body to know which times you’re going to be most productive.
For more information on successfully running a medical practice and finding the perfect medical office lease in Los Angeles, contact the experts at Boulevard Medical Properties.

Working with Your Ultradian Rhythm

Most of us are familiar with the Circadian Rhythm, the 24-hour cycle when we shift between wakefulness and sleep. Within the cycle are shorter blocks of time when we feel most productive.

It’s called the ultradian cycle—the time when we should spend more time doing the most important tasks of the day.

What does the ultradian cycle have to do with productivity?

The ultradian cycle is a 90-minute block of time when we experience heightened focus. Since our concentration is the highest during this time, it makes sense to do the most important tasks of the day. Tasks that require critical thinking, problem solving, and strategizing are best tackled during this time.

After the 90-minute sprint, you can still do some more work, but your focus will be on a slump. This is the best time to schedule routine work and other tasks that do not require a lot of thinking.
As the ultradian cycle does not come at the same time for everyone, it helps to know when heightened concentration ebbs and flows. Here’s how you can determine the most and least productive hours of your day:

1. Create an energy map

Night owl or early bird? We sometimes use this as basis for when we’re most productive. But this leaves a lot of room for error (and disappointment) as it doesn’t reflect when your energy and focus are at their highest.

To find out when you are most likely to get things done, record your energy and concentration levels in hourly intervals. You can use either a journal or spreadsheet for recording your data. Do this for a couple of weeks—you will eventually see a pattern that reflects your most and least productive days.

2. Identify when to perform your tasks

Which of your daily activities require the most concentration? Which activities can you perform on autopilot? The secret to becoming productive is working in sprints. During this time, you can combine critical-thinking tasks and low-energy activities to make the most of the 90-minute ultradian window. Schedule tasks that don’t require much energy after the challenging ones.

3. Create a tentative plan for the upcoming week

Every Friday, draft a schedule of your to-dos for the following week. Write down all the things you want to accomplish and assign them on a specific day. For example, you do a lot of creative thinking on Tuesdays at 10am. Schedule your most challenging activity at this time. Since you know from your energy map when your energy and focus are highest, take advantage of these hours to increase your productivity.

Expect interruptions to happen

Being productive comes at a different time for everyone, so it’s important to know when your ultradian cycle is. As much as you’d like to maximize your 90-minute work sprint, the reality is that interruptions are likely to happen during this time.

The bottom line is that productivity is more about learning how to work smarter. While you can’t force concentration, you can schedule your most challenging activities at a time when distractions are the lowest; making sure that it intersects with the time when your energy and focus are highest.

Medical Office Lease in Los Angeles

The Boulevard Investment Group helps medical professionals find the ideal medical office lease in Los Angeles for their practice. Get in touch today to find the perfect space for your office.

Guide to Choosing the Right Location for Your Medical Office

Finding the right location for your medical practice is just as important as finding the right location when you are purchasing a home. No matter what type of real estate you are looking at, the adage rings true, it’s all about location, location, location. Read on to learn more about what to consider when looking for a new location for your medical office and what pitfalls you would be wise to avoid.

For assistance in locating the right medical office lease in Los Angeles, utilize Boulevard’s property search feature.

Consider your Patients

The first thing to consider when looking at office locations is the type of patients you already have and those you wish to attract. What are your patient demographics? What is your specialty? Is your practice full of women, men, athletes, baby boomers, kids? Taking this into consideration really can impact your location.

For example, is your current practice full of suburban baby boomers? Then perhaps a strip mall in the outskirts of town is what you need to make it convenient for your patients to get to you and to market effectively to grow your practice.

But what if your practice is full of young or working professionals? Then an office in the suburbs would be difficult for them to get to you. You might want to consider something downtown so those working in the city center can get to you quickly and easily.

What if your patient base if full of athletes? Then perhaps you should consider setting up an office location near a university or the practice facility for a professional sports team, or even a popular gym. This would allow you to market to your base and make it easy for them to see you. Considering your patient base and your specialty can be critical in choosing the right location.

Consider Your Competition

Another key component to think about when choosing a location is your competition. You want to put yourself in a position to succeed so you need to look at the competition in your area. If there are five other professionals within a ten-mile radius practicing the same thing you are, then you might want to look somewhere else for office space. Do your homework and check the population to professional ratio for your area.

If you are just starting out and you find that your competition is overpopulating the upscale neighborhoods in the area you want, consider setting up your practice in the suburbs just a few miles away. There might be some opportunity to develop a large patient base. Your competition could be overlooking a potentially lucrative area.

You should also investigate whether the population of the area you want is growing or declining. It is typically easier to set up shop in a newer community rather than try to break in to an established area with a lot of competition. A lot of this information is available on the U.S. Census website. There is a great deal of information available if you are willing to take the time to comb through the site. You should also contact the local Chamber of Commerce as they have some great information available as well.

Additional Considerations

If your practice is going to rely heavily on insurance, you should take a close look at the employers in the area. Do they offer the insurance you accept? You should also consider locating your office next to a hospital as this can create a good image as you will be in an area associated with health care.

And, of course, there are many things to consider in terms of the actual building you are looking for. If future expansion is your goal, does the space offer enough square footage? Does the location offer convenient, well-lit parking? What does the building look like? Is it well maintained, or does it look run down?

Medical Office Lease in Los Angeles

There is a lot to consider as you research a potential medical office lease in Los Angeles. A smart piece of due diligence would be to contact Boulevard Medical Properties to schedule a consultation. The Boulevard team has the knowledge and expertise to point you in the right direction and get you into a space that works for your organization.

Benefits of Sharing Your Office Space

If your business is looking for office space but you aren’t sure how much you will need or you can’t find a space that is the right fit, you might want to consider sharing some office space. It might seem like an inconvenient concept but there are some advantages that could save you money and increase your productivity.

For more information about finding the right medical office lease in Los Angeles for your practice, contact Boulevard Medical Properties for a comprehensive selection of the most recent openings that may be the perfect fit for you.

Low Overhead

Perhaps the greatest benefit, especially if you are running a small business or you’re a lone proprietor, is the low overhead that comes from sharing the load with others. Community spaces offer some nice perks including space for networking, meetings and even some quiet space if that is what you require. You aren’t responsible for the full share of the rent, electricity, office furniture, cleaning costs, security, etc. You can budget appropriately and not have to worry about any unforeseen expenses.

Sharing office space also allows you to take advantage of an existing technology infrastructure rather than setting up your own. Technology can be an expense that is just out of reach for some small business owners so utilizing a shared space can be a great solution. Many shared spaces have on-site IT support so you can get up and running quickly and you have the help you need if something goes wrong. You can concentrate on your work instead of the costly infrastructure.

Another perk is the advantage of a short lease. Many shared spaces offer a variety of flexible options to choose from, especially if you only need the space for a few months or you grow quickly and need to make an adjustment. You typically don’t have to make a long-term commitment that could tie you to a lease that could end up costing you more in the long run.

Choosing to share some office space can also provide you with added security. Most spaces have some type of entrance technology that can track who has access and who comes and goes. And some buildings even have around-the-clock desk security. This can provide you and any of your employers with some peace of mind that the environment is safe.

Networking Opportunities

Another benefit of sharing office space is the networking conversations that come from sharing a communal space. Getting to know those who share your space could provide some great partnerships and collaborative opportunities. For example, if you are a marketing professional, you might find yourself sharing a space with a graphic designer or web site designer. You can create a team of professionals to collaborate with on specific projects without having to actually hire a full-time staff.

Mentors, Resources and High-Level Collaboration

Some shared spaces have ties to local universities offering workshops, mentoring and other collaborative perks. Shared spaces also can provide inexpensive or free parking, conference and meeting space with long distance phone and internet access, office supplies like printers, scanners or copiers which can be expensive to purchase on your own, as well as a mailing address and even a receptionist in some locations.

Sharing an office space can help you to have a professional look as you start your business and allow you to develop some potentially beneficial partnerships. Another great benefit to consider is the fact that you will have some room to grow. You can form your team and have the space to develop in the way that best works for you.

Finding the Right Medical Office Lease in Los Angeles

If you are looking for the right space for your medical office, contact Boulevard Medical Properties now and schedule a consultation. The Boulevard team has the knowledge and expertise to point you in the right direction and get you into a medical office lease in Los Angeles that works for your practice.