Keeping a Medical Office Clean

There is no arguing that first impressions matter. Whether you are meeting a new patient face-to-face or when there is a new client walking into your office for the first time, you want to make sure that you and your office look presentable. In addition to a well-designed office, you want to make sure that your medical office is impeccably clean as well. A simple cleaning won’t cut it as you want to keep your office sterile and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Keep your office clean to keep your office efficient.

Keeping your office clean should be top of mind, and it doesn’t have to be difficult. Here are some ways to stay on top of your office’s cleanliness:

Cleaning Services

Depending on your area, there are likely many cleaning services there that specialize in cleaning medical offices. You can look one up online using online review websites, or simply ask another health professional in the area if they can recommend a good one. A cleaning service has many benefits over cleaning your office yourself.

A great advantage to using a cleaning service is that it will save you and your staff time – thoroughly cleaning a medical office is not a quick task. You can also trust the cleaning service to clean every nook and cranny of your office that you might miss. However, make sure to be in communication with the cleaning service about any areas that need extra attention. They also should not be your office’s sole source of cleaning; you need to keep your office clean and sterile during the day as well (more on that next).

Guidelines for Staff

Your office will also need to be kept clean and sterile throughout the day, so make sure to clearly communicate cleanliness guidelines with your staff. Rooms will need to be cleaned after each patient, hands will need to be washed constantly, and more:

• When spills happen, clean them up as soon as they occur. Don’t let whatever spilled sit on the floor, and remember to use appropriate cleaning products.
• In exam rooms, use disposable paper and wipe down with disinfectant when needed.
• Regularly check the restrooms to make sure they are clean and tidy. Replace toilet paper and even use a disinfectant germicidal solution in toilet bowls during the day.
• Doorknobs and light switches get dirty too! Remember to clean with a disinfectant regularly.
• After each patient and before seeing a new one, make sure to wash your hands.
• Make sure that gloves are disposed of properly in infectious waste containers.
• Establish safe biohazard waste practices. Clean and disinfect any areas that come in contact with biohazards immediately and dispose of any biohazardous material in the proper receptacle.
• Keep employee areas clean too. Make sure that your staff keep their workspaces clean and uncluttered. Also make sure the breakroom is cleaned after every use, and remember to clean out the fridge at least once a week.
• Have the right cleaning tools and supplies on hand, and make sure your staff knows how to use them. It’s best to keep them in the same place so that everyone knows where they are.
• If a patient alerts you to a problem area, make sure to clean it immediately.
• If necessary, create a checklist for your staff. Remembering what to clean and when can be easy to forget.

No patient wants to go to a doctor’s office and question the cleanliness. Make sure to keep your office clean, sterile, uncluttered and smelling nice to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and to create a nicer environment for your client.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office.

How Much Staff is Needed in a Medical Office?

Determining how much medical office staffing you need can be a tough code to crack. There is no exact science to it, but there are industry guidelines that can point you in the right direction.

Every medical practice is different and has different needs, so finding what works specifically for your office is key. Here are some tips and guidelines to follow to help you determine how many people to hire:

Research Medical Office Staffing

Your first step should be to research and find reliable sources to point you in the right direction. the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), Practice Support Resources (PSR), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) all should have some good data that you can look over. When researching, you want to find the answers to these 2 questions:

1. Do we have enough people to do the work?

2. Are your staffing costs in line with other practices in the same field and size?

To answer those questions, you want to look for data points that address the percentage of revenue spent on support staff salaries and the how many support staff is needed per full-time-equivalent (FTE) physician.

Remember: While it’s important to research these data points, your office is unique and has different needs. Take your research as a starting point, and don’t be afraid to adjust if needed.

Support Staff to FTE Physicians

This ratio is crucial to determining how much staff is needed in your medical office as it tells you how many full-time staff will support one doctor. You can calculate the ratio with this method:

1. Figure out how many doctors work full time in your practice.

2. For the doctors working less than full time, divide their average number of hours by what you consider full times hours. For example, let’s say a doctor works 30 hours per week and you consider a full work week to be 40 hours. So 30/40 is .75, meaning that doctor’s FTE status is .75.

3. Now, calculate your total number of FTE physicians by adding the doctors from steps 1 and 2 together. So, if you have two full time doctors and one that works 30 hours a week, your total number of FTE doctors would be 2.75.

To determine your total number of FTE support staff, follow the same process and then you will arrive at your ratio of FTE support staff to FTE physicians. Using your research, this can help you determine how many people are needed in your office.

Other Factors

In most cases, other factors and special circumstances will affect medical office staffing– numbers alone will not calculate this. Your office will probably require both medical support staff as well as admin support staff. Don’t forget to take these job duties into consideration:

• Front desk and phone staff are needed at most practices. They will need to check patients in and out, schedule appointments and more. As your practice grows, you may need to have one person dedicated to answering the phones.

• You may need one person dedicated to referrals if you are a primary care office with more than three or four doctors.

• Billing can be outsourced or processed in-house, it’s up to you. Typically, one FTE employee is needed for every two physicians.

• Depending on the size of your practice, you may need a manager. If you have a lot of support staff, you may want to consider hiring one.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. We have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because we understand that every practice is unique, we can provide a custom space for your office.

Top Tips to Making Your Office Handicap Accessible

Making your office handicap accessible for your employees is vital to support a happy workplace environment. It’s important that all employees feel comfortable and are able to complete their jobs without any unnecessary hindrances. Wheelchair users and other people with disabilities affecting their mobility should be able to feel at ease in their work environment.

Making your office handicap accessible does not have to be difficult. A few changes can make a big difference. A key to making your office more accessible to avoid singling out certain employees. Rather, you want to make the office as a whole more accessible.

Do This First

You need to first determine how accessible your office is before you make any changes – which can be difficult if you yourself do not require accessible features. You can survey employees anonymously to give them a safe space to voice their concerns. Some may be hesitant to come forward if you haven’t asked them about this topic, so asking them through a survey is important.

Main Ways to Increase Accessibility

• Doors, especially heavy ones, can be difficult for someone using a wheelchair to open. Consider installing automatic doors that can be opened at the touch of a button. If that is out of the budget, you can install industrial gas springs to make the doors easier to open.

• There should be disabled parking spaces in your parking lot. The spaces should be as close to the entrance as possible, and require a blue badge to park in.

• If your office is in a multi-story building, make sure there is an elevator that employees can easily access. While stairs are great for able-bodied younger people, they can be hard on older employees and practically impossible to navigate for disabled employees.

• Make sure hallways are wide enough to accommodate different types of wheelchairs.

• Don’t forget about the bathroom. If your office does not have a big enough stall, you should consider installing one as soon as you can. If there are a few different bathrooms and only one is accessible, make sure that there is a sign telling people where to go.

• If the main entrance to your building or an entrance to an office space is not accessible, but there is an accessible entrance, make sure a sign is posted. The sign should tell people where to go to enter the building or office space.

• Spend some time with your employees to train them on appropriate interactions with people with disabilities. While your office needs to be physically accessible, your employees will also need to know how to treat people with disabilities.

• Offer employees flex time. This is an accommodation often requested by people with disabilities and is an easy way to help employees to stay healthy.

• People with low vision may have a hard time reading something in small print, so consider using larger print.

• Some employees may have a hard time operating their computer, so you can help them by installing programs to make it easier. Windows, Mac and other operating systems often have these features built in. To supplement these, there are a number of free programs available online.

• Once your office is completely accessible, get the word out. Include it on your website and recruiting materials so that people will know.

Making your office accessible can make your workplace more credible and more welcoming as an employer. You don’t want to miss out on great employee talent because your office is uninviting to people with limited mobility. With these changes, you should be on your way to becoming a friendlier office for all employees.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office.

Summer Office Decorations to Brighten Your Day

Warmer weather and longer days mean that summertime is officially here. While no one wants to be stuck at their cubicle on a beautiful summer day, there are ways to bring the summer-feel to your office. Consider these Summer office decorations and themes to help you cope with being stuck at your desk on a bright, sunny day.

General Design Tips

First, here are some general design tips to follow so that your decorations will be aesthetically pleasing and functional for the office:

• Colors and color schemes can be used to create the ideal office space. Although it may seem simple, colors can brighten up your corporate space. Your color scheme will depend on what type of office or medical practice you have, so choose a theme accordingly. Picking a color scheme should be one of the first things you do when decorating your office.

• Photos can help make your office feel more comfortable. Hang up photos of employees and encourage them to decorate their space with pictures of their family and friends.

• Choose decorations and art pieces wisely. These decorations and art pieces are a great opportunity to represent yourself and your attitudes, so choose them carefully. For example, neutral colors can convey a more conservative personality, while bright colors can suggest a creative personality. Whichever decorations you choose will set the tone for your office.

• Remember to keep things clean. Keep a handle on the clutter and trash around your office. Put away things that you do not use very often, and make sure to utilize storage space.

Summer office decorations will incorporate these tips, plus a few specific suggestions:

Color Scheme

First, you want to think of a summery color scheme to decorate your office that will go along with your theme. Maybe you want to go for a beach look, so you will want to choose light blues, white, sand colors and even shades of yellow. Thinking of a color scheme first will help you tie together your decorations for a cohesive look.

Fun Decorations

Once you have your color scheme picked out, think about any fun decorations or art pieces to go with your theme. Party supply stores and discount retail stores, like T.J. Maxx, will have lots of different options.

For art pieces, make sure they are appropriate for your work-space and will help maintain a professional tone. Displaying art can be a great way to show your personality. You can even ask local artists if they would want to display their art in your office.

Summer Plants

Plants can help your office feel more natural and homey, and certain ones can bring the summer vibes to your corporate space. They add a unique splash of color to your space and can even add a fresh fragrance. When choosing a plant, make sure that you will have enough space to store the plant, make sure the office has the right lighting and temperature, ensure that the color and size will go with other office decorations and don’t for get to water the plant.

For a summer feel, consider adding succulents and mini cacti. The benefit of these plants, besides looking unique and one-of-a-kind, is that they require way less maintenance than other plants. In other words, they are hard to kill if you lack a green thumb.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. We have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal, and nonprofit community clinics. Because we understand that every practice is unique, we can provide a custom space for your office. ‬

How to Choose the Right Location for Your Medical Practice

Choosing the right spot when moving medical offices is critical to the success of your business. When you choose the right location, you can watch your business grow and flourish. Picking the right place is more an art form, not an exact science. There are a lot of factors to take into consideration when moving medical offices.

Patient-to-Professional Ratio

This little-known secret is majorly helpful when moving medical offices. You can do a simple analysis of when looking at potential areas. Look at the number of medical practices that do the same thing you do compared to the number of people. If there’s big number of medical practices, it’s best to move on. For example, if you’re a dentist it would be difficult to break into a community that has a lot of dentists already. Professionals usually overpopulate upscale areas, and are missing big opportunities a few miles away in middle/lower income areas.

Demographics

Another important consideration is the demographics of the area. The local chamber of commerce or newspaper should have them readily available. Start with compiling information from at least three areas that you’re considering.

First, think about the type of patient you are trying to or usually attract. Then look at the demographic information from each place for a match. Also look whether the population has been declining or increasing. Know that it’s easier to break into new areas where you won’t have to struggle to take patients away from already established practices. And obviously, you want to avoid fading communities.

Traffic

Often a forgotten about factor is the traffic patterns in an area. You might have to dig a little deeper in your research or go out there on your own to observe, but it will definitely pay off.

What you want to look for is the amount of cars going down the street of your potential new location. 40,000 cars a day is considered a prime retail location. Also take into consideration the traffic. Is it heavier during rush hour or about the same? Is it a generally lighter traffic area? Since we all hate traffic, plan accordingly.

You can also choose the side of the street for your location. Maybe on one side there’s a clearly marked way right into the parking lot, but on the other side you have to make a U-turn to get into the parking lot. Traffic could also be heavier on the West side than on the East side. Try to make getting to your location as convenient as possible for your patients.

Spreading the Word

If your practice is consumer-direct, you’ve got to be visible from the street. Does the landlord or city have any signage restrictions? Is your office visible from the street? Are there already many signs crowding the street that will make yours hard to see? After all, if consumers can’t see you from the street, you may as well not be there. Paying for a spot with great visibility can be more expensive, but it can pay off.

Specialists

If you’re a specialist, you have one more factor to consider: your proximity to large, referring practices. If you don’t have a relationship with those offices, find a way to introduce yourself and network. It can really pay off.

It even helps to be in the same building as them with your office on the ground floor. If you do that, 100% of the building foot traffic will go right by your door.

Common Sense

When choosing the right location for your medical practice you should do one thing above all: practice good common sense. For example, podiatrists probably either want to be on the first floor of the building or be in a building with a reliable, working elevator. Don’t be that podiatrist on the third floor of building with only stairs – how will your patients with foot problems get to you?

Choosing a new office space can be fun, exciting and even a little stressful. Follow these tips and tricks to lessen the stress and find the perfect space.

Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office. ‬

The Custom Office Move-in Process

Moving or expanding your office can be a huge undertaking, and working out the logistics can be overwhelming. If the process seems stressful, there are alternatives to doing it by yourself. Need help with your new office move in checklist?

Boulevard LA is here to help. We have a custom office move in checklist and process that can take the stress and annoyance out of setting up your new office space. From finding the perfect space for your medical or dental practice to putting in place the last decoration, Boulevard LA can perform the whole process from start to finish for you.

The process in broken down into three parts:

1. Designing the perfect office
2. Decorating
3. Building your new space

To design your office, we will work with a preferred building contractor and an architect. We will come up with the ultimate plan to maximize the space and make it visually appealing and practical while taking your patients’ and staff’s specific needs into consideration and set your office up for success. Any necessary city permitting or construction that comes up during the big move will be taken care of.

Next, we will work with you to plan an office space customized to your taste. Interior designers will help you select paint colors, cabinets, flooring and more for your new office. Our network of preferred interior designers is a wealth of knowledge, having years of experience designing medical and dental offices in Los Angeles. Their goal is to design your space so that it makes a great first impression for your patients.

The third step in this process is actually building your new space. Once the plans have been finalized and the decorations picked out, the construction can start. Their contractors have years of experience building medical and dental offices, so they are knowledgeable about the complexity of moving and placing medical equipment. They will give you updates about the process, taking the stress and worry out of moving.

While Boulevard LA will take care of most aspects of your move, add these tips to your new office move in checklist:

• Start planning the move as soon as possible. They are generally planned months in advance, with larger moves planned even earlier. You might even have to move during non-work hours outside of the 9-5 Monday-Friday schedule.
• Get to know the new building or space before moving in. Check to see if there are any specific requirements for the new building, like flooring requirements. Walk through the pace with the building manager to make sure the space is ready for move-in – i.e. no leaks, broken bulbs, etc.
• Keep your employees informed at every stage of the move and let them know about it as soon as you can. Give them some time before moving day to pack up their things and take personal items with them.
• Create announcements about the move. You can announce it on your website and social media, create new business cards and flyers and let your patients know when you talk to them.
• On the actual moving day, have 2 managers present during the entire move. One should be at the old office and the other at the new place.
• Make sure to clean the clutter from your current office when you move. Extra clutter will take up valuable space and time to move.
• Create a checklist so that you remember to do certain tasks. You can create different checklists for planning your move, move-in day and for your employees.
• Communication is one of the most important parts of a move. Communicate frequently with your movers, your staff, your patients and anyone else involved.
Boulevard LA specializes in custom, state-of-the-art medical and dental office space in Downtown Los Angeles. They have worked with clients like Quest Diagnostics, USC Fertility and Perinatal and nonprofit community clinics. Because they understand that every practice is unique, they can provide a custom space for your office. If you have questions about your new office move in checklist contact us today!

7 Questions to Ask Yourself When Moving to a New Office Space

The cost of office space is one of the single largest expenditures for any medical practice, so it’s important to know exactly what you’re getting from your space before signing a lease. You want to be cost effective, but it’s also essential to find a space that works for your medical practice’s needs. The last thing you want to do is move into a new space and find out that it’s not working out, forcing you to spend even more to break the lease and move again. Plus, constant moves can lose you patients. Here are some ideas for a moving offices checklist and questions to ask before you move into a new office space.

1. Is Renting or Buying Better for My Practice?

Buying a property for your medical practice’s office space may actually be a better option for your practice than renting one. For example, buying opens up doors for making your property an investment, provides more potential for expansion without relocation, and makes annual costs more predictable. On the other hand, renting requires less upfront cost and less commitment to the locations, and you don’t have to handle refinancing. Working with a real estate professional can help you determine which option is right for your practice’s needs.

2. How Much Space Do We Need?

Size is probably the primary consideration when it comes to determining your practices needs. Too little space and your practice will be crowded and take a hit to productivity, but too much space is a waste of money. A general rule when determining your medical practice’s space needs is 1200 to 1500 square feet for the first physician (or single physician practices), plus 1000 1200 square feet for each additional physician. Some practices, like psychiatrists, will need less while others, such as outpatient surgery centers or practices with large equipment, will need much more. An average family physician will generally need about three exam rooms and one procedure room, but this can vary depending on specialties and the number of physicians in the practice. At minimum, a medical practice should have a reception area, a front office, a physician’s office, two treatment rooms, and a restroom.

3. What Are Our Accessibility Needs?

All medical offices need to be handicap accessible, but, like with space needs, certain practices will have greater accessibility needs than others because of the patients they receive. For example, a physical therapist or an orthopedist will likely see far more patients with mobility issues than a dermatologist or a periodontist. Your practice needs enough parking spaces, elevators, and ramp access to easily accommodate handicapped patients without causing waits, crowded, or awkward situations. Automatic doors may also be a good addition. Remember that bathrooms and exam rooms need to be easily accessible, with plenty of room to turn a wheelchair around inside, and with all of the necessary supports to help a patient with limited mobility move around, and don’t forget to leave room for wheelchair parking in waiting areas.

4. How Much Will It Really Cost?

Obviously rental or mortgage payments have to be made, but not all payment systems are alike, and there’s plenty more that must be factored in before you can really understand the cost of your space. Some landlords require tenants to have insurance for the space, and while some will foot the bill themselves, others pass that responsibility onto you. Know who’s responsible for utilities. Sometimes landlords will absorb these costs, other times it’s all on the tenants, and still other times there’s a division of responsibility. Be sure you know how much you can expect to pay each month and remember, a space with cheaper rent can still be costlier than a space with a higher rent if utilities are lower. Higher rent may also come with benefits like property maintenance or pest control that would otherwise come out of your pocket, while lower rent may be because of problems and lower profitability associated with the property. Finally, don’t be afraid to shop around. By moving just a short distance farther from a major hospital, you may be able to get a nearly identical space for much less.

5. What’s the Timeline?

First, make sure your building will let you move in when you want, so you aren’t on the hook for the apartment before you need it, but can also be certain that the space will be available for you when you need it. You should also know how long the lease length is and how much flexibility you have with negotiating lease length to make sure you’ll have the property for the time frame that’s right for you. You should also make sure you know what your options are once the lease is up. Will renewing the lease be an option and how will the price be affected?

6. Who Is Responsible for What?

The divisions of responsibility in a rental aren’t necessarily consistent between properties. Make sure you know who is responsible for which utilities and how much of each. Even if some utilities are included in the cost of rent, all may not be, and some landlords only cover up to a certain amount. You also need to know who’s responsible for maintenance. You don’t want to commit to a property only to be surprised when you have to arrange and foot the bill for repairs or upkeep. You also need to know if you or the landlord pays for improvements to the space.
When you are through with your moving offices checklist, it’s time to settle in. If your practice needs a home, or you are just looking to expand, contact Boulevard LA today. We offer a number of locations that are suitable for medical practices of all kinds. We have years of experience finding suitable spaces for specialty offices and general practices, so schedule a meeting today to see what we can do to get you into the perfect medical office space for you and your practice.

Cinco de Mayo Party Ideas for the Office

Office celebrations can be a lot of fun, but they’re also great for improving the productivity of your office. Office parties improve morale by giving you a chance to make sure your medical office knows how much you appreciate them and the work they do, and by giving your staff a chance to relax and bond with each other, increasing teamwork and group cohesion in your office. With Cinco de Mayo right around the corner, now is a great time to throw together an office party that is both fun and helpful for your practice. Let’s take a look at some of the best Cinco de Mayo party ideas for your office this year.

Festive Food and Drink

Food and drink are the best parts of any part, but for many of us, Cinco de Mayo brings to mind images of margaritas and imported beers. These drinks are best enjoyed after your medical practice closes, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of options for your office’s Cinco de Mayo festivities. For more work appropriate fare, alcohol free margaritas (though you may want to keep these out of sight of your patients to avoid awkward questions) and, of course, traditional Mexican foods and their Tex-Mex cousins tend to be major crowd pleasers. Mexican colas, which use real cane sugar instead of corn syrup can also be a hit. Guacamole, salsa, and queso are all great snack options to keep in your break room for staff to grab when they have a chance.

For a more comprehensive option, try a lunchtime taco, nacho, or burrito bar for your staff. This can be quickly, easily, and inexpensively whipped up by you or a staff volunteer, or you can splurge a little and have a local restaurant cater for extra authenticity and even less effort. If you really don’t want to go without. Don’t forget to be sensitive to any staff members with dietary limitations by incorporating alternative choices that they can eat, dairy or gluten free options for any staff members with dietary limitations.

Create the Right Atmosphere

Aside from food and beverages, decor is the most important part of any party or celebration. You can go all out with carefully placed sombreros, a hanging Mexican flag, and lights and Mexico and Cinco de Mayo themed banners strung up around your office. Alternatively, for a thriftier approach, simply use store bought or even homemade decorations in the colors of the Mexican flag: red, green, and white.

Don’t forget to choose the right music to finish off your fun and festive atmosphere. Traditionally, Cinco de Mayo is celebrated with mariachi music, but for a more modern take, try a Mexican pop radio station, either through standard publicly accessible radio stations or through your medical practice’s internet radio provider.

Be Culturally Sensitive

Remember that Cinco de Mayo is a culturally significant holiday, so try learning a bit about the history of the holiday so you know why you are even celebrating in the first place. Cinco de Mayo celebrates the unexpected victory of the Mexican army over the French in 1862 at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. In Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is a relatively minor holiday, but it later became a way for Mexican-Americans to celebrate their Mexican culture and pride and has now become a celebration of Mexican culture in general throughout much of the United States. Recognize and appreciate this history – and keep your office party classy – by avoiding the stereotypes and hurtful jokes that are found in many Cinco de Mayo celebrations.

Celebrate Throughout the Year

Cinco de Mayo may only come around once a year, but there are plenty of holidays that you can celebrate at your office to create a festive atmosphere, have fun at work, and keep your medical practice’s staff’s morale high. For more office party ideas, see our guides for celebrating Easter and Saint Patrick’s Day in your medical office.

Boulevard Medical Properties

Even the medical practice with the best Cinco de Mayo party ideas needs the right office space. That’s where Boulevard Medical Properties comes in. Boulevard LA is a Los Angeles based medical property specialist that can help your practice through the entire moving process, from finding a property to moving in. We can even help you develop an eco-friendly medical practice. Whether you are interested in expanding your practice into an additional location or want to move into a new space entirely, Boulevard LA has the experience and skilled staff to help, so contact our office today.

The Importance of a Good Receptionist

Some people consider the receptionist to be the most important staff member, or at least the most significant in determining how smoothly, effectively, and successfully an office runs. There’s even a holiday set aside for appreciating and honoring receptionists. But what makes a skilled and personable receptionist so essential? Read on to find out what traits a good receptionist should have, what to look for in a receptionist, and why they are so vital to the success of your office or medical practice.

Your Office’s First Impression

When considering what to look for in a receptionist, one must think about representation. Every member of your staff is a brand representative for your medical practice, whose behavior and appearance reflect on the entire practice. As your receptionist is generally the first face that patients see when they walk into your office and is the first point of contact when patients call, it is of the utmost importance that they make a great first impression. Your receptionist should have a professional appearance that makes him or her seem approachable and friendly. They should greet patients as soon as they walk through the door and interact with them in a polite, helpful, and friendly manner. A good receptionist should also have the knowledge to be able to answer patient’s questions. Most importantly, all of these things should be true at all times. Even during busy times or bad days, it is the receptionist’s job to project an air of helpfulness and positivity to all patients, both in person and over the phone.

Office Coordination

As the primary point of contact for the office, communication makes up a huge portion of a receptionist’s job. Your receptionist will need to facilitate communication between members of your medical practice’s staff, as well as between the office and its patients, payors, and vendors. The information that your receptionist provides will rarely be questioned, so accuracy is essential to prevent complicated and damaging mix ups. Your receptionist should be able to keep their cool under fire, communicating calmly and effectively, even when faced with a difficult patient or a tricky problem with a vendor. They should be able to manage a ringing phone, rapidly filling inbox, and growing line at her desk in a way that handles all inquiries as quickly as possible, while still making sure that every patient feels valued and every issue is resolved smoothly. Patients should never feel rushed by your receptionist, who should instead be a careful and conscientious listener. Your receptionist should also carefully maintain a calendar for the office and send out reminders before any important events, as well as be able to clearly distribute information to office staff and patients.

“Jack-of-All Trades” Capability

Because your receptionist works with everyone in your practice to facilitate communication and coordinate tasks, he or she needs to know everything that’s going on in your office and what everyone’s job is. This makes your receptionist a vital resource for team members who need information or support from another part of the team. This generalized knowledge and wide range of skills also makes your receptionist a valuable extra set of hands when you are short staffed or simply have an office to do list that has gotten a little too lengthy. Your receptionist can help plan upcoming events, manage the creation and distribution of promotional materials, handle mailing, restock storage areas, straighten up untidy spaces, and contact patients, payers, and vendors. A particularly experienced receptionist may even be able to assist more senior employees in their work. This jack-of-all trades mentality is what to look for in a receptionist.

Problem Solving

Your receptionist’s wide range of skills and abilities also makes them resourceful and flexible, ideal traits for problem solving. Your receptionist is often the first person in your office to encounter a tricky problem, whether it’s a problem with a vendor or an irate patient. A good receptionist is able to think quickly and creatively to resolve the issue in a way that keeps your practice running as smoothly as possible and makes both your patients and your staff confident and comfortable. In some situations, you may not even realize that a problem occurred in the first place!

Get More Help for Your Office

What to look for in a receptionist and understanding why they are so important can be very professionally enlightening. An excellent receptionist is key to running a successful and effective office or medical practice, but even the world’s best receptionist can’t help with every possible issue, like moving or expanding your medical office. That’s where Boulevard Medical Properties comes in. Boulevard LA is a Los Angeles based medical property specialist that can help your practice through the entire moving process, from finding a property to moving in. We can even help you develop an eco-friendly medical practice. Whether you are interested in expanding your practice into an additional location or want to move into a new space entirely, Boulevard LA has the experience and skilled staff to help, so contact our office today.

Your Checklist For Moving a Medical Office

You have found a great new space for your medical practice. You’ve even picked out the day or days that you will be moving offices. This can be a very exciting time for a medical practice, but it can also be overwhelming. Even for the most organized and prepared medical practice, it can be very easy to inadvertently let things slip through the cracks during the moving process, leading to excess stress or disaster later. If you’re moving your medical practice, try using this handy moving checklist to help keep your organized throughout the moving process.

Let Employees Know

You may have talked to some of your employees during the moving process, but don’t take for granted that the news has been passed around the office. Hold a meeting or send out a memo to make sure that all staff members are on the same page. Keep everyone updated about the process and send out reminders about upcoming deadlines to do with the moving process.

Let Payers Know

To ensure that revenue continues to flow in smoothly, let payers, such as Medicare and insurance companies, know about the move as soon as you have your new address. Different payers will have different requirements for what needs to be done to keep up with credentials, so be sure to communicate with payers to find out exactly what you need to do to make the process as smooth as possible.

Let Patients Know

Finally, let all your patients know that you’ll be moving offices. There are a number of form letters available that can be used, or make the message personal by composing your own. To make sure that every patient finds out, communicate to every single patient, even those in the same family or household, using all methods of communication that you can. Remember to include the new address, directions or a basic idea of the practice’s new location, and any new contact information that goes with the office, such as a new telephone number.

Establish an Inventory

It’s easy enough to misplace things in a residential move, but with medical offices the stakes are high. You’ll be moving expensive equipment, sensitive documents, and controlled substances. It’s important to have a complete, detailed record of all items you’ll be moving, including who’s responsible for transporting them between locations to avoid mix ups. You can also take this opportunity to get rid of any outdated technology or equipment or things you simply don’t use.

Have Utilities Transferred

Well ahead of the move, let utility companies know about your move, including the date and new address. Don’t forget to check utilities the day you move in to make sure everything is working before you start receiving patients in your practice’s new location.

Update Marketing Materials

Next, you’ll want to make sure that all of your information is correct to allow new patients to find and contact you. Change your practice’s website and update any business cards, fliers, and stationary. Inform the phone book publisher of your new address and contact information so that it can be updated in future copies, and let any directory websites know about the change to your address and any contact information.

Remind Patients with Upcoming Appointments

The last thing you need while adjusting to your new office space is for patients to not show up in the right place. Send out postcards or make phone calls (or, even better, do both) to remind patients with upcoming appointments of the location and provide them with directions to help make sure they show up to the right location on time for their appointment.

Order Signage

This is an easy step to forget, but it can make a big difference in how smoothly starting at your medical practice’s new location will be. Make sure you have clear signage for the exterior, clearly indicating the name of your practice, and making it obvious which building or unit you can be found in. You also want to have signage for the inside of your practice, clearly marking waiting rooms, exam rooms, and other spaces in your practice. You will also want to provide clear signage guiding patients to the exit, both for emergencies and for easily walking out of the practice. Mark where patients should check in, especially if there are multiple front desks for different purposes or patients, and check out.

Know Who to Ask for Help

Even with resources like this, moving offices isn’t easy, and neither is running a medical practice. Whether you’re looking to move medical practices, want to open a new location, need new medical equipment, or have any other issue or concern with your practice, contact Boulevard LA today. With our years of experience in assisting medical offices, both specialty and general, we can help your practice be all it can be.